Romesco white bean dip

For those of you holidaying abroad this summer, or considering it’s the end of August, have already spent your week away and have hoiday blues. You’ve wined and dined eating the local cuisine, immersed yourself in a new culture, had many failed attempts at the local lingo, driven on the wrong side of the road and made many memories.

That’s what holidays are really about the memories.

A certain time and place, the view, the company, it all adds up to make these memories. Ever had lunch on a beach drinking a glass of wine, to go and buy that very same bottle to take home, but when it comes to drinking, it just doesn’t taste as good. Or asked the waiter for the recipe for that sublime paella or meze dish to cook it at home, it most likely won’t taste as good.

So I bring to you a take on a famous sauce from the northern region of Spain, Catalonia. The romesco sauce is punchy from the paprika and cayenne but rich due to the almonds and Spanish olive oil. If you’ve ever experienced a true romesco sauce, no this won’t be the same, it may not be as good, it may even be better?!? But it has its feet stuck firmly in its roots.

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The original sauce uses bread as a thickener, a good white sourdough or chunky country loaf is ideal as it also imparts some flavour. Here though I’ve opted for some white beans. When making a dip I tend to gravitate towards a plantbased protein, typically in the form of lentils or beans, so whether it comes to afternoon snacking or building a big veggie bowl it will keep me sustained. White beans help to thicken the dip and provide a creaminess meaning less oil is needed plus who doesn’t like an alternative to hummus!?! I may feel the urge to bathe in it, but sometimes a change is necessary, so in comes this bright red beauty.

How much chilli, and which variety of chilli you use is comepletely up to you. I use a picante paprika by La Chinata, it is the hot smoked kind so has a good kick, if you’re using paprika just from the supermarket you may need to add a little more to get the right smoky level. Also I used half a dried ancho chilli which has sweeter fruity notes and isn’t too spicy but dried chilli flakes will substitute just finneeeeee. You won’t need to rehydrate these so just add straight to the food processor.

 

I served this in a few different ways, just as a dip with crudites, once in a big veggie bowl packed with sweet potato and courgette chips, avocado, some grains and greens. Another time in a packed lunch with olives, carrot, extra butter beans and a few other veggies thrown in the mix. Stir in some extra olive oil, vinegar if you like and a drop of water to make a killer salad dressing that will liven up any old salad. Or serve with some simply cooked fish or chicken or steak, or smeared underneath a plate of roasted meditteranean veg. I like to work on a leftover lunch policy, they are always the best ones. Throw together whatever is lingering, the crazier and more random sure will be the better!

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Enough chatting, let’s hop to it!

Romesco white bean dip

  • Servings: one big bowl full
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 tin of white beans (I used haricot)
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 red peppers
  • 1 tbsp tomato puree ( I had 2 tbsp of tinned cherry tomatoes that were leftover)
  • 1 tbsp sherry vinegar
  • 1 tbsp almond butter or a handful of almonds (roasting them would make it taste even better)
  • 1/2 dried ancho chilli (or 1/2 tsp chilli flakes)
  • 1/2 tsp picante smoked paprika (use 1 tsp of paprika if it’s not as strong)
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 good pinches of salt
  • small handful of fresh parsley

Directions

  1. Set the oven to 190C/170C fan. Place the peppers on a tray and put in the oven for up to 45 minutes until the skin is blackened and the peppers are soft. Set aside to cool.
  2. Meanwhile put the 1/2 ancho chilli in a mug and pour enough boiling water over to cover and leave to rehydrate.
  3. Once the peppers are cool enough to handle peel away the charred skins and remove the seeds and white membranes. Then put into a food processor.
  4. Place all the other ingredients along with the ancho chilli (not the water though) in the food processor and blitz until a smooth puree is formed.
  5. Taste and check for seasoning, salt, smokiness, acidity, spiciness and adjust as you like.
  6. Scoop into a serving bowl, garnish with extra parsley or store in a Tupperware where it will keep for around 5 days.

Have you got any favourite recipes from past holidays that you make on repeat at home? Maybe it’s the peri peri chicken from Portugal, a rabbit stew from Malta (that’s one that is on my list) a further flung pav bhaji from Mumbai or fava, one of my favourite Greek dishes that I still haven’t got round to cooking. Don’t you worry I’ll be in a yellow split pea frenzy by the time I’m back in my kitchen!

Enjoy the last of your summer!

X

 

Mexican Black Bean Dip

Hummus is my GO-TO thing. Lunch or dinner looking a bit dull? HUMMUS. Need a healthy snack full of protein and fibre? HUMMUS. Need a dish to take along to a friend’s party or gathering? HUMMUS. Ran out of the last lot of hummus? Time to make some HUMMUS.

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I understand how easy and accessible hummus is nowadays, your local Tesco Express probably stocks at least 4 or 5 different varieties, and it is a good way of adding some healthy fats and protein into your diet. Looking at the label, the ingredients are pretty familiar but the levels of fat and salt can be pretty high, so the serving size is limited to 1/4 of a pot. Seriously, does anyone stick to that guideline? It takes some stroonggggg will power, one of which, I don’t have.

I’m totally ok with that.

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I do prefer home made though. It leaves space to mix up the beans and pulses, as we all know eating a predominantly plant based diet requires lots of variety, so rotate those legumes. Chickpea is the classic, but try Butter bean or Cannellini bean for some smoooooth dipping. I always try to buy the best tinned beans I can afford, in the supermarkets they do an organic range which is in a carton with no added salt. I would soak and cook them myself but always end up forgetting, and this girl is not waiting for beans to soak to get her hummus fix. If you’re much more organised than me, than by all means using dried beans is a thriftier (and usually tastier) option.

 

Most of my recipes and creations tend to involve using up a glut of things in my fridge. This time it happened to be coriander, which always wilts quicker than I can use it up. And the Saturday curry night never uses the entire bunch – I do love my coriander it gets sprinkled on everything – but still there will be some left. I also wanted to make a black bean dip to change things up a bit. Refried beans has to be up there in one of my favourite things to eat. Just give me a bowl of refried beans, guacamole and salsa. That’s one happy Thea, just leave me be.

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So the general elements of hummus, chickpeas, lemon, garlic, cumin, olive oil, tahini and salt all get a little switch around. Here we have black beans (but feel free to use kidney beans if you can’t get hold of them), lime, garlic, ground cumin and coriander, chilli, pumpkin seeds, fresh coriander and salt. Rather simple, takes only a few minutes in the trusty food processor (mine is older than me, it’s vintage!) and is ready to dollop at your hearts desire. Carrot sticks at the ready!

Mexican Black Bean Dip

Ingredients

  • 1 tin of black beans, drained
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 small bunch of coriander
  • 1 small handful pumpkin seeds
  • 1 green chilli, de-seeded
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • Lime
  • 2 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil/rapeseed oil

Method

  1. Put the drained black beans into a food processor along with the peeled garlic clove, pumpkin seeds and ground spices
  2. Chop the stalks of the coriander roughly and add it all into the food processor along with the zest and juice of 1/2 the lime.
  3. Chop the chilli and add along with a big pinch of salt and the oil and blitz.
  4. Leave the motor running for a minute or two, you may need to scrape down the sides until smooth, then taste. Add any extra salt, lime or chilli you feel necessary.
  5. Scrape into a serving dish or Tupperware where it will keep for 5 days.

Enjoy you lovely lot!

X

Butterbean, macadamia and rosemary hummus

I remember my first time seeing hummus, having never eaten it or it being featured in our fridge, my thoughts weren’t leaning the same way as they are now. I remember being at my friend’s house, much younger, and seeing a tub of something  besides a bag of carrots. Now dips weren’t a part of my life as they are now, that does indeed mean no guac, hummus, baba ganoush, muhammara, salsa, tahini (I know it’s scandalous) perhaps the odd sighting of a sour cream and chive or some tzatziki. So coming across hummus, when I first tried it there was no convincing me. For young tastebuds only just developing away from chips and bread and butter, the savoury, garlicky tang of hummus didn’t do it for me.

I tried again possibly in my early teens, we had just bought a new blender and I found a recipe for homemade hummus. I thought, what could possibly go wrong, had a go, and remember it tasted a bit rubbish. Bland, chalky and just a bit meh. I’m sure that happened a few times, determined as I was to make it like the one you buy in shops, as I kept being told: ‘homemade is ALWAYS better than shop bought’. In my case that wasn’t true. A couple years later again, after week on week buying shop bought hummus (I had bought into the hype), I gave it one last shot. A simple cupboard raid recipe to use up that tahini after thinking it would be nice on porridge (another thing which hadn’t yet found a place in my heart) so in it went with all other common ingredients. Chickpeas, garlic, lemon, salt (lots of that), tahini, olive oil, a pinch of cumin and water to thin it out. Easy.

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Since that day as few years back, I’ve been making it to the same recipe ever since. I’ve had friends comment having the same experience as me, ‘I had a go at making hummus and it just wasn’t that great, so I gave up and bought some’.  Completely understandable, and you’ll probably think, as I did, that buying one is so much more efficient. Guaranteed it will taste right and no fiddly washing up. However shop bought dips contain so much more salt and fat than when whizzed up in your own food processor. If hummus is a daily thing on your plate or for a snack, changing it up a bit will benefit your pocket, tastebuds and waistline.

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Just make sure to keep a form of beans and any nut or seed butter in your cupboards, then you’re just two minutes away from a satisfying lunch or dinner or a friend for the lonely carrot in the bottom of your veg drawer. Even on Christmas morning, I was providing the starters for our dinner, and had a mini panic that I hadn’t made enough. I had prepared a salmon rillettes with mini toasts and crudités, but with the addition of a vegetarian to our family, a big bowl of hummus was surely on the cards. It always goes down well with a crowd and they will be really impressed if you’ve made it yourself.

Don’t get me wrong, when I’m travelling or away from home I can’t make my own so I always buy a shop bought. The best that I can afford. Look for one made with extra virgin olive oil or rapeseed oil rather than sunflower oil, and fresh garlic (not the powdered version), make sure it contains tahini and opt for organic if it’s within your price margin. Even in India I managed to buy hummus, it had lumps of black olives in and on first encounter I thought it had gone off, and it wasn’t that great but we all need that fix. And when in Greece, don’t expect to find any because hummus is most definitely not Greek. Fava will be your hero item on the menu, and a very good one too.

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Every time I make a batch, it lasts easily for a week in the fridge, but is usually licked clean within a few days. I also tend to change the type of bean and added flavours each time to keep things a bit new and exciting. If you want a traditional hummus, swap the butter beans for chickpeas and omit the Rosemary adding around 1/2 heaped teaspoon of ground cumin instead.

I had just used the food processor to make some roasted macadamia nut butter, so instead of washing the bowl I left some around the sides, stuck all the hummus ingredients on top and added another dollop for good measure. It made it even creamier than usual with a nice toasty flavour from the nuts. Of course they are expensive ingredients so feel free to use tahini, light or dark to your preference.

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Butter bean, macadamia and rosemary hummus

Ingredients

  • 1 tin or carton of butterbeans
  • 2 small cloves of garlic
  • 3 heaped tbsp macadamia nut butter (or tahini)
  • 5 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • pinch of ground cumin
  • salt and pepper

Method

  1. Drain the butterbeans and rinse well, tip into a food processor along with all the other ingredients.
  2. Add a BIG pinch of salt
  3. Whizz up until it forms a paste and is completely smooth. Taste for seasoning then drizzle in cold water to thin the hummus out. Transfer to a bowl or Tupperware and serve.

 

May your hummus problems be for forever resolved, when you get it right it really does taste better than shop bought. Next time try mixing up the flavours, a swirl of harissa there, some turmeric and curry powder here, lemon zest and finely chopped coriander, pureed beetroot and some finely chopped dill, or some roasted carrots and cumin seeds. Hummus is such a great source of fibre from the beans, healthy fats, calcium from the tahini and antibacterial properties from the raw garlic. A real deal SUPERFOOD.

(Disclaimer, superfoods is just a selling ploy used by brands and supermarkets, hummus isn’t scientifically proven to be a superfood, it’s not going to bring you back from the dead or anything. However it is a food and it tastes pretty super so…).

 

Much love and happy dipping

X

A tribute to toast

Bread

All you carbophones keep on scrolling as you won’t be interested. BUT YOU SHOULD BE.

Is there anything better in life than some fresh bread, sourdough, baguette, white, brown anything goes, and smothered (we’re not talking a thin coat, I mean 1 inch thick) with butter. That’s salted. Always.

I went through a sad time in my life after reading too many of these health food blogs in this ‘wellness world’, when I decided that carbs were bad. Which meant completely avoiding bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, even grains such as quinoa, buckwheat, spelt and at one point even rye. I thought they would make you put on weight, all we need is a paleo way of life. Vegetables and protein and lots of fat.

But my idea of that didn’t include much protein. So basically I was surviving on just vegetables, avocado and nuts. And I wondered why I was hungry all the time…

(Do not go down this route, it’s not good, not good at all!)

So in an attempt to get my life together and learn to practice balance, carbs have come flooding back in. BIG TIME.

You see they are kinda necessary. Carbohydrates in the form of starchy foods need to make up up to a third of what we eat. Apart from being an excellent source of energy (the slow releasing sort) they contain calcium, iron, B vitamins and most importantly fibre. Every little bit adds up to that 30g of fibre we need a day.

So in a bid to put on some much needed pounds and give myself the energy to power through not just workouts but my whole day, more carbs it is. There could be worse things.

Now when it comes to bread I do love some sourdough. Hefty, chewy and with that must have tang, as it is is best. Or dunked into some steaming soup. My love affair with bread however was rekindled by a certain rye bread. Now considered to be popular among the health food lovers amongst us, and the main component of a #basic breakfast, Biona rye bread is the one. 

Sworn on by the Danes, and most of Scandinavia, rye bread is nothing new. It’s been eaten daily by all walks of life before it became trendy. And why shouldn’t it be, with such a rich deep flavour, that toasts up to perfection.

Did I just mention toast?

Stuck in a mealtime rut, or just so hangry that you need something in your mouth, RIGHT NOW!

Toast is always the answer.

It can be topped an infinite number of ways. Sweet, savoury, or mix the two together, and you don’t have to stick to plain avo with salt and lemon. Although why mess with a classic, it has a time and a place.

Black tahini, kiwi and passionfruit


So let’s av’ it. Toast up your bread till nice and crispy and get ready to devour, veerrryyyyyyy soon.

Arf n arf. For you lot not from the north, it is indeed half and half (usually in the form of half chips and half rice with a curry)


Sweet options are up first.

  • Peanut butter and banana

Ok, ok use almond, cashew whatever else, but pb is LIFE, and its’ soulmate is banana. Sprinkle with a good amount of cinnamon, bee pollen and cacao nibs. Fancy pants enough for you?

  • Nut butter and berries

So this is where the sweeter flavour of almond or cashew comes into play. If you can grab a coconut almond butter from either Meridian or Pip and Nut, you’re laughing. It compliments the tart berries to perfection, add some flaked coconut and perhaps more seeds for that crunch factor. 

  • Peanut butter, kiwi and granola

Granola on toast? Yep you read that right. After having seen @jescoxnutritionist post this on Instagram I knew she was on to something. It really is as good as it sounds. Make sure the kiwi and ripe and juicy, sliced thinly on top of some (make it crunchy) peanut butter, a good dousing with granola and a drizzle of date syrup for a little sweetness. The best by far, I think so!

  • Apple, tahini and cinnamon

If you’re a tahini lover this will float your boat. Smother the bread with dark, light or black tahini. Thinly slice an apple (British if possible), fan out across the toast, add the obligatory cinnamon and whatever other sprinkles you like. Quick, simple and most importantly tasty. 

  • Baked Fig, tahini and yogurt

Now if you follow me on instagram you’ll have seen me post this the other morning. Figs are in season for such a short time so grab em quick! Bake some figs for around 10 mins until warm and juicy, spread the toast liberally with tahini, swirl on the teeniest tiniest bit of raw honey, top with figs, yogurt dollops and lotsa cinnamon. The sweet stuff.

  • Avo, berries and nut butter

Feeling indecisive, why not mix the two together.

  • Peach Melba toast

Spread with coconut yogurt, top with thinly sliced peach and raspberries, sprinkle with hemp seeds and bee pollen. Feel like the ultimate summer goddess.

Now for some savoury tings, acceptable for breakfast lunch or dinner. Get on it! No I’m not going to get all egg on toast here, although that’s always a good option, here’s to something different. 

  • Avo on toast #basic

Go simple and smash it on there with a squeeze of lemon or lime to be zesty, and good pinch of salt and some chilli flakes.

  • Miso and tahini (future names for my cats), avo on toast   

An idea I got from the lovely blog, Dolly and Oatmeal. Mix a good tbsp of your favourite tahini with a small amount of white or brown miso and spread on toast. Top with sliced avo a good squeeze of lime and some sesame seeds for a sprinklinn’.

  • Avocado, strawberries and feta

When it’s summer and the sweetest of strawberries are in season,this is stellar. Mash the avo, spread on your toast, top with thinly sliced strawberries (nectarine/peaches are also good) and add feta or goats cheese. Its got that salty, sweet thing.

  • Avo, pea and feta smash

It is what is says, add some finely chopped parsley, a squeeze of lemon and get spreading. Top with seeds and some rocket leaves.

  • Tahini, cucumber and smoked salmon
  • Beetroot, smashed avo and smoked mackerel
  • Hummus, mashed butternut squash, sliced tomatoes and chillies. Throw a little smoked paprika on there too. 

Messy, but still delicious. Hummus is always the right answer.


Obviously this not a definitive list, use up whatever’s left in your fridge to create something new, or stick to a well loved classic. Just always try to include some protein (animal or plantbased) and a small amount of fat, that way you’ll keep on chugging easily until the next big feed!

A toast to toast

Much love

X

The Mae Deli

Me and my mum are best friends. There is no one else on this earth that I would trust more than my mum. We do everything together, I ring her a few times a day and then we talk for hours. I feel so so grateful, and I’m so glad that we have this relationship. Maybe it’s me being an only child, having no brothers or sisters to play with, there’s no other choice really (and sorry dad, I love you but I don’t want to watch football or talk about sheds). 

Now that I’m away during the week and don’t see my mum as often, I find it quite hard. For one it’s because I can’t afford to go out to nice places like we do when we’re together, and two because I love to share experiences with someone else. Going to exhibitions or cool restaurants by yourself just isn’t as fun. There’s no one to ooh and ahh with, and laugh about daft art (we are fans of an art gallery to be frank).

I look forward to the few times a year when my mum comes to visit me in London for a day out. Obviously I plan the day around where we will eat, and we go from there. Typically a vegetarian or health foodie spot for some lunch then a must visit restaurant I’ve been eyeing up on Instagram for dinner. Probably involves some serious carbing or deep fried crispy goodness because, BALANCE people! 

Most of the time though I’m by myself, either I haven’t got any friends around, or no one else can afford to spend the money. For me however I spend all my money on food, occasionally clothes, but mainly food so it will include a detour to Wholefoods or Planet Organic too (my weakness). Staring at all the new things on the shelves makes me tick. Weird I understand, but we all have our ways.

Once in a while, I start to get sick of my food. I KNOW, bet you never thought I’d be saying that. But think of it this way. When you’re cooking just for yourself only for four to five days it’s not possible to buy a wide variety of foods, so the same thing day in day out, only altered ever so slightly tends to become the norm. Now you see, pretty boring. When I start to get these pangs for variety I take myself out for a little lunch date. Yepp, solo. If anyone fancies joining me, that would be rather lovely, as long as you don’t mind me instagramming my food before you can start eating it #issues.

So off I trot to a healthy hot spot that’s been lurking on my radar. I could swear that every time I tick one off the list, another two new ones get added. It never ends!!! But I’m not complaining. 

And when it’s variety I’m after a quick tube to Marble Arch is all it takes to reach The Mae Deli.

I’m sure there’s no need for me to explain if you’ve been on this planet for the last few years, or if you live on cloud cuckoo land I shall begin:

Opened up by the blogger wellness warrior that is Deliciously Ella and her husband Matt, The Mae Deli is a cafe where you can eat ‘Deliciously Ella style’ and obviously walk out like a glowing goddess, and they’ve even made it accessible for the non vegan crowd by providing a side of either chicken or salmon if you so wish. 

Open for breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner or even a sweet pick me up there is so much on offer here. The portions are generous so you won’t be leaving hungry.

For the three times I have visited I’ve always opted for the Mae bowl, a selection of four of the salads, dips or hot options that you can mix and match to your liking. Pretty good right! I can’t leave a review of anything else as I just haven’t tried them, there’s always a next time…

For breakfast, expect porridge, avo on toast, chia pots, coconut yogurt and granola, smoothies, juices and shakshuka. After your deli bowl maybe grab a matcha latte, turmeric latte, coffee or loose leaf tea, and if you’re feeling not so virtuous one of the sweet delights that tempt you on top of the counter.

Also available to buy are Deliciously Ella’s books, loaves of bread, bags of granola and the Deliciously Ella energy balls available in three flavours, cashew and ginger, cacao and almond and hazelnut and raisin (the last is my faveeee).

There’s plenty of seating, and downstairs feels a little like your best friends house cosy, warm and comforting. If you arrive at 1 or 7 (peak times!!!) beware you will probably have to queue but it’s definitely worth it.

When I say ‘Deliciously Ella’ you’re probably thinking all kale and quinoa. Of course they feature but it’s a hell of a lot better than that, the menus change seasonally but there’s always two dips on offer, obviously I’ve always gone for the hummus and if you don’t you’re missing out! Expect sweet potato dishes, warming curries rich in coconut milk, avocados galore, sundried tomato falafel 😻😻. There’s more inspiration to make you want to eat like this 24/7 than you could shake a stick at!! So go, right now if you can, your dinner will be delicious (apparently just like Ella).

Happy eating my loves

X
(I apologise for the lack of photos, they seem to have all gone from my phone, well at least there’s a mystery so you just have to go to find out for yourself) 

Black truffle and chilli hummus

No matter how much I love cooking and want to cook at home, there comes a time when it’s necessary to let your palate experience new flavours, and also myself get inspired. Recently my imagination hasn’t been too wild. Usually I have ideas springing up left right and centre. New concepts I’ve seen on blogs, or on restaurant menus, ways of preparing ingredients I’ve not tried before. I have my little notebook for the MUST COOK things, and dishes to also recreate. 

At the moment, there seems to be nothing happening in that creative side of my brain. Maybe it’s a change in season,but I seem to be stuck on the same day to day bandwagon. Typically one that involves, avocado, sweet potato, hummus, tomatoes, salad, quinoa. Peas if I have them, because they are just the tastiest little morsels. Neither my mum nor my dad like peas so I was never fed them as a child. There was a pea ban in our house. How very wrong. I like to think that now I’m making up for that over the past few years by eating them possibly everyday. (Aaaandddd sneaking them into the food I cook for my parents, mum no longer ‘hates’ them, RESULT!!) 

Don’t get me wrong, that situation ain’t too bad. Anything that involves hummus just gets elevated to, ‘that’s what I’m talking about’, flavour town!!

Guilty!! I’m having to declare that i dont always make my hummus. But who can carry a food processor round in a suitcase? If there’s anyone out there willing to show me how I’m open for ideas. Until then, bought it is. I always try to buy the best quality one I can find, preferably organic, using rapeseed or extra virgin olive oil and no added nasties. The ingredients list should say: chickpeas, tahini, garlic, salt, olive oil. And not much else. 

‘Is that all that goes into hummus?!?’ I hear you cry. Why yes. It’s so simple, can be whizzed up in minutes and by adding different spices, herbs, vegetables you can change the flavour up. Not getting bored of it now are we!

I was having a good scrolling marathon on Instagram the other day, when I saw a post from a cafe I’ve recently visited in London called Saladpride. I’m always racking my brains and Pinterest trying to think of new combinations, hoping for that winner. I think I may have found it.

Not from my mind, so maybe I shouldn’t be taking full responsibility, but I’m sure it’s not a world first, everyone takes ideas from other people that’s how we develop and expand.

Truffle and chilli hummus. 

I love how your attention was swiftly diverted back to this post. 

After spending my weeks holiday in Croatia, obviously I picked up a jar (or two) of truffles. One black and one white. Mixed with other mushrooms, the black one with olives and capers too and the white with cream and Parmesan. Anyone else thinking spread the White one on avo on toast, or is it just me?!?!

I added a good few dollops of the black truffle paste into my hummus, it gives a deep earthy flavour, and a good pinch of chilli flakes for a nice warmth. You’ll want to add this to your hummus flavour rotation, even if you only ever make it plain, please change that today. Get your your food processor and give it a whizz!!

I’ve realised that we probably don’t all collect food items from abroad and truffle paste might not be something you can find on your bog standard supermarket shelf. Perhaps substitute some of the oil with truffle oil instead. Don’t overdo it though, truffle is powerful stuff!
Black truffle and chilli hummus

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas (preferably organic and the can bpa free)
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 3 heaped tbsp of tahini 
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 5 tbsp rapeseed oil or EVOO
  • 1 – 2 heaped tsp of black truffle paste
  • Good pinch of chilli flakes
  • Cayenne to sprinkle on top

Method

  1. Drain your chickpeas and rinse them before putting in the food processor
  2. Peel the cloves of garlic and put in with the chickpeas and the tahini
  3. Blend until everything is fully combined and no longer chunky
  4. Add all the other ingredients and blend again till really smooth. Add water a little at a time until it’s at a dollopy consistency and add a couple of pinches of sea salt, more truffle and/or chilli if you wish. 
  5. Scrape into a bowl to serve, sprinkle on extra chilli flakes and some cayenne if you like a kick and a drizzle of some more oil
  6. Serve as a dip with crudités, crackers, pitta, roast sweet potato wedges, with your salad, on a burger, sandwich, or as I do eaten with a spoon. 

I really do hope you make this one. I’ve made many a variety of hummus (is there a plural, hummi???) but this one beats them all hands down.

Happy dipping!!

X